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Getting down to business at the Franschhoek Literary Festival

Business and the economy are hot topics in South Africa every day, and are already heating up the programme of the 2016 Franschhoek Literary Festival.

Africa is Open for BusinessHow South Africa WorksThe Looting MachineInnovationGod, Spies and LiesA Manifesto For Social Change

 

The 2016 FLF takes place on the 13, 14 and 15 May.

See also:

* * * * *

FRIDAY 16h00-17h00

[40] What is business as usual in Africa? (New School Hall)

CNBC and Power FM presenter Victor Kgomoeswana (Africa is Open for Business) discusses business in Africa with Brenthurst Foundation Director Greg Mills (How South Africa Works) and Financial Times investigations correspondent Tom Burgis (The Looting Machine)..

SATURDAY 11h30-12h30

[63] Can entrepreneurs be made? (Old School Hall)

Former Business Day editor Songezo Zibi (How South Africa Works) asks Greg Mills, multi-award-winning science journalist and the science editor at the Mail & Guardian Sarah Wild (Innovation: Shaping South Africa through Science) and Victor Kgomoeswana what is needed from and for South African entrepreneurs.

SATURDAY 16h00-17h00

[91] The reporting business (Old School Hall)

Columnist/broadcaster Mike Wills asks Claire Bisseker (Financial Mail), Songezo Zibi (former editor Business Day) and Tom Burgis (Financial Times) about the challenges and responsibilities of reporting about the economy and business in a changing world, from the nitty gritty of stock markets to the big stories and how they are covered.

SUNDAY 11h30

[112] Do you understand the South African economy? (New School Hall)

John Matisonn (God, Spies and Lies: Finding South Africa’s Future Through its Past) will discuss how to get to grips with South Africa’s complex and precarious economy with Greg Mills and Moeletsi Mbeki (A Manifesto For Social Change: How To Save South Africa).

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All the debut novelists at the 2016 Franschhoek Literary Festival

Writing a first novel is a major achievement.

We celebrate some of the newest writers on the block at the Franschhoek Literary Festival this year, six of whom, published in 2015, have made it onto the Sunday Times Barry Ronge Fiction Prize longlist.

11 first-time novelists will appear in 22 events across the three days of the festival this year.

Joining the local authors are a writer from Ireland and another from Nigeria/USA.

The 2016 FLF takes place on the 13, 14 and 15 May.

See also:

* * * * *

In order of their first events, here is who to look out for:

flfThe RaftFred Strydom: The Raft

Strydom’s dystopian fiction follows the story of one man on his quest to discover the truth behind Day Zero: the day humankind lost its memory.

Strydom will appear in three events on Friday 13 May, and one on Saturday 14 May.

Friday:

[1] What so great about speculative fiction. With Lauren Beukes and Scarlett Thomas, chaired by Joe Vaz.
[42] From first lines to last. With Claire Robertson and Scarlett Thomas, chaired by Victor Dlamini.
[49] What was that?! An oral story-telling enactment, led by Amabookabooka’s Jonathan Ancer, with Lauren Beukes and Louis Greenberg.

Saturday:

[68] Knowing when to stop. With Niq Mhlongo and Steven Boykey Sidley, chaired by Ekow Duker.
 
 
 

flfPowers of the KnifeBontle Senne: Powers of the Knife

Powers of the Knife is the first book in the Shadow Chasers trilogy. It’s an African fantasy adventure for young adults – one part family saga, one part hero’s quest.

Bontle will participate in two events on Friday 13 May:

Friday:

[6] Just imagine! With Nakhane Touré and Rosie Rowell, and Karabo Kgolen in the chair.
[15] Creating captivating childen’s books. With Helen Brain and Marlene Winburg, and Dianne Stewart chairing.

 
 
 

flfPiggy Boy's BluesNakhane Touré: Piggy Boy’s Blues

Davide’s journey from the city to pastoral Alice for peace and quiet, disturbs and troubles the silence and day-to-day practices that his uncle and the man he lives with have kept, resulting in a series of tragic events.

Touré will appear in two events on Friday 13 May and two on Saturday 14 May.

Friday:

[5] Just imagine! with Bontle Senne and Rosie Rowell, chaired by Karabo Kgoleng. Schools interest.
[33] The reader within. With Finuala Dowling and Sara Baume (see below), chaired by Michele Magwood.

Saturday:

[73] In conversation with … Victor Dlamini speaks to musicians-cum-writers Hugh Masekela and Nakhane Touré.
[95] Creative writing techniques. With Claire Robertson and Sara Baume, chaired by Karabo Kgoleng.
 
 
 

flfTaking ChancesSicelo Kula: Taking Chances

The 10th book in the Harmony High series, which follows the lives of a group of teenagers attending a fictional township high and reflects their choices, struggles and triumphs.

Kula will be part of one event on Friday 13.

[18] Have you got a reading habit? With Dianne Case, Kgauhelo Dube, chaired by Samantha Page.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

flfWhat Will People SayRehana Rossouw: What Will People Say

Neville and Magda Fourie live in Hanover Park with their three children, trying to “raise them decent” in a township festering with gang wars and barricaded with burning tyres.

Rossouw, in her second appearance at the FLF, will appear in one event each day of the 2016 festival.

Friday:

[26] Contemporary issues in fiction. With Nthikeng Mohlele and Patrick Flanery, chaired by Nancy Richards.

Saturday:

[86] Language and character in literature. With Claire Robertson and Finuala Dowling, chaired by Harry Garuba.

Sunday:

[117] Journos writing books. With Claire Robertson, chaired by Rebecca Davis.
 
 
 

flfSpill Simmer Falter WitherSara Baume: Spill Simmer Falter Wither

27 April update: With regret, Sara Baume has had to withdraw from the festival for family reasons.

A misfit man finds a misfit dog. Both are accustomed to being alone, unloved, outcast. Spanning the four seasons echoed in the title, a savage act forces them to abandon the precarious life they’ve established, and take to the road.

Baume’s presence at FLF 2016 has been made possible with the support of a Culture Ireland grant.

She will appear in four events in the course of the weekend.

Friday:

[33] The reader within. With Finuala Dowling and Nakhane Touré, chaired by Michele Magwood.

Saturday:

[54] “This is how it was …” With Javier Perez and Sindiwe Magona, chaired by Victor Dlamini.
[95] Creative writing techniques. With Clare Robertson and Nakhane Touré, chaired by Karabo Kgoleng.

Sunday:

[104] First books. With David Cornwell (see below), chaired by Damon Galgut.
 
 
 

flfA Slim, Green SilenceBeverly Rycroft: A Slim, Green Silence

Scheepersdorp, a small South African (fictional) town in 1995 forms the backdrop to the tale of Connie as she unravels the stories of her loved ones, and allows a secret of her own past to emerge.

Rycroft presented this novel at the FLF in 2015, and has previously appeared on the poetry programme. She will appear in one fiction and one poetry event at FLF 2016.

Friday:

[46] Finding your first story. With Chinelo Okparanta (see below), chaired by Karabo Kgoleng.

Sunday:

[119] The personal journey of poetry. With Eliza Kentridge, chaired by Nick Mulgrew.
 
 
 

flfUnder the Udala TreesChinelo Okparanta: Under the Udala Trees

The story of two girls from different ethnic communities who fall in love during Nigeria’s civil war, a love that has to be hidden. Okparanta uses one woman’s lifetime to examines the ways in which Nigerians continue to struggle toward selfhood.

Okparantawas born in Nigeria and lives in the USA. Her presence at the festival is made possible with the support of Delta Airlines. She will appear in one event on each day of the festival.

Friday:

[46] Finding your first story. With Beverly Rycroft, chaired by Karabo Kgoleng.

Saturday:

[67] Writing relationships. With David Cornwell and Nthikeng Mohlele, chaired by Karina Szczurek.

Sunday:

[128] Writing from the outside. With Ekow Duker and Patrick Flanery, chaired by Alison Lowry.

 
 
 
flfThe YearningMohale Mashigo: The Yearning

The story of Marubini, a young woman whose past starts spilling into her present. Something from her past is making her sick and her mother is not willing to tell her what it is. She embarks on a magical and frightening journey to find out what it is that haunts her.

Mashigo will appear in an event on Saturday 14 May:

[56] Women’s journeys in fiction. With Bridget Pitt, chaired by Palesa Morudu.

 
 
 
 
 
flfRecipes for Love and Murder: A Tannie Maria MysterySally Andrew: Recipes for Love and Murder: A Tannie Maria Mystery

Meet Tannie Maria: small town agony aunt turned amateur detective when a woman in the area is murdered. She becomes entangled in an investigation that blends intrigue, romance and cooking …

Andrew will participate in two events at the festival.

Saturday:

[58] Food in fiction. With Kathryn White and Paige Nick, chaired by Michele Magwood.

Sunday:

[118] Murder, she wrote. With Karin Brynard and Michéle Rowe, chaired by Catherine du Toit.

 
 
 

flfLike It MattersDavid Cornwell: Like It Matters

The story of the life of a man cast adrift, until he meets a woman who comes with a story of her own.

Cornwell will appear in two events over the course of the FLF weekend.

Saturday:

[67] Writing relationships. With Chinelo Okparanta and Nthikeng Mohlele, chaired by Karina Szczurek.

Sunday:

[104] First books. With Sara Baume, chaired by Damon Galgut.
 
 
 

flfThe Seed ThiefJacqui L’Ange: The Seed Thief

Botantist Maddy Bellani, on a journey to collect rare seeds of a Brazilian plant protected by a secretive sect, enters a world influenced by unscrupulous pharmaceutical companies and the selfish motives of others.

L’Ange will be part of an event on Saturday 14 May:

[83] Seeds of the imagination. With Charlotte Otter and Scarlett Thomas, chaired by Darrel Bristow-Bovey.

 
 
 
 
 

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13 poetic reasons to visit the 2016 Franschhoek Literary Festival

Franschhoek Literary Festival
I Am MemoryNotes from the Dementia WardBearingsFlame in the SnowBare and Breaking
Signs for an ExhibitionThe Myth of This Is That We're All in This TogetherA Slim, Green SilenceA Saving BannisterBeyond the Delivery RoomMatric Rage

 
Conceptualised in 2006, the Franschhoek Literary Festival has garnered much attention from poetry enthusiasts. The three-day festival in May will include poetry readings, a competition, discussions and performance poetry. There will be poetry from across the spectrum from well-known poets to new voices and 13 poetry sessions over this autumn weekend in Franschhoek.

To celebrate this art form with local and international poets, you can book for discussions ranging from hip-hop, learning how to write, read and hear poetry, the personal journeys of poets, young voices from Sudan, Nigeria and South Africa, multilingualism and translation in poetry, a discussion around the themes of nature in poetry, to the differing styles and delivery of spoken and written poetry.

Poets will include Mbongeni Nomkonwana, Karin Schimke, Jumoke Verissimo, Safia Elhillo, Blaq Pearl, Khadija Heeger, Adam Haupt, Nick Mulgrew, Beverly Rycroft, Eliza Kentridge, Primrose Mrwebi, Isobel Dixon, Katleho Shoro, Quentin Williams, Linda Kaoma, Wendy Woodward, Finuala Dowling and Genna Gardini.

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Poetry unplugged at the Franschhoek Literary Festival

Franschhoek Literary Festival

 

If you enjoy the rhythm of words, then you will enjoy this year’s poetry at the 10th annual Franschhoek Literary Festival, to be held over three days in May.

Notes from the Dementia WardBearingsFlame in the SnowBare and Breaking

 
Poets participating in all of the poetry events will read from their work, but a number of purely performance events are also on offer:

Friday, 13 May

Listen to high school learners participate in the Poetry for Life competition finals, hosted by multiple-award winning poet Finuala Dowling, and judged by poet and literary agent Isobel Dixon, poet and sociocultural linguist of the University of the Western Cape Quentin Williams, poet, translator, critic, and occasional writer of fiction Leon de Kock, and Poetry for Life coordinator, Celia van Druten.

Later on that same evening some of the festival poets will be reading from their work at Essence Restaurant, where the audience can enjoy poetry while they enjoy a glass of wine or a meal, hosted by Karin Schimke. Entry is free.

Saturday, 14 May

Listen to performance poets Primrose Mrwebi, Blaq Pearl, Katleho Shoro and Quentin Williams perform at the poetry programme venue in the Protea Hotel.

Sunday, 14 May

Three up-and-coming poets will also share their work in the event Young Voices from Around the World, with South Africa’s Katleho Shoro, Jumoke Verissimo from Nigeria and Safia Elhillo (Sudan/USA).

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2016 Franschhoek Literary Festival programme

FLF programme


 
The programme for this year’s Franschhoek Literary Festival has been revealed!

The 2016 FLF takes place on the 13, 14 and 15 May.

Please note, tickets are only due to go on sale on Webtickets on Wednesday, 16 March.

 
FRIDAY, 13 May

(Please note: all events marked for ‘Schools’ are open to the general public as well.)

FRIDAY 10h00-11h00

[1] Schools: What’s so great about speculative fiction? (New School Hall)

The RaftBroken MonstersThe End of Mr Y

Fred Strydom (The Raft), Lauren Beukes (Broken Monsters) and Scarlett Thomas (The End of Mr Y, and other works) consider the line between speculation and realism, and why some of the most exciting literature can often be found between the covers of sci-fi, fantasy and dystopian fiction books.

Chaired by Joe Vaz (editor, Something Wicked).

[2] Dream varsity SA (Old School Hall)

Chaired by Dr Wamuwi Mbao (Lecturer, SU), Prof. Anwar Mall (Acting Deputy Vice Chancellor, UCT), Prof. Beverley Thaver (Deputy Dean, Research, Education Faculty UWC), and Ian Currie (Wits Master’s student) explore what a transformed university would look like.

[3] Schools: Learn to draw like Korky Paul (Church Hall)

Winnie the Witch: Stories, Music, and Magic!

Acclaimed illustrator of Winnie the Witch and other children’s books, Korky Paul shows young artists how to bring stories to life through illustration.

[4] Schools: The magic of story (Congregational Church)

Being a Woman in Cape TownChasing The Tails of My Father’s Cattle

Samantha Page chats to storytellers Kapilolo Mahongo (Manyeka Arts Trust), Nancy Richards (Being a Woman in Cape Town), and Sindiwe Magona (Chasing the Tails of My Father’s Cattle) about how writing and sharing our own stories reveals our true selves and brings us closer to others.

An event that will inspire young storytellers.

[5] Schools (early childhood educators’ interest): Ndiyaqonda. I understand. Ek verstaan. (Council Chamber)

Palesa Morudu (Cover2Cover) discusses how providing books in mother-tongue and other languages helps to encourage multilingualism, with Arabella Koopman (Nal’ibali), Elinor Sisulu (Puku Children’s Literature Foundation) and Margie Cunnama (FLF Library Fund).

[6] Schools: Just imagine! (Hospice Hall)

nullPiggy Boy's BluesAlmost Grace

With literary journalist Karabo Kgoleng in the chair, Bontle Senne (The Powers of the Knife), Nakhane Touré (Piggy Boy’s Blues) and Rosie Rowell (Almost Grace) share how imagination frees the mind and lets in empathy, creativity and vision.

[7] Schools: Setworks that work (Protea Hotel 1)

CapeTalk’s John Maytham, with theatre director Fred Abrahamse, Linda Shwana and Mpolise Kanase (Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy learners) discuss the purpose and success of setwork books and the relevance of Shakespeare and other European literature in our schools today. What should South African pupils actually be reading and why?

[8] Schools: Poetry – Write, read, hear (Protea Hotel 2)

Notes from the Dementia WardBearingsA Saving Bannister

Poetry was not written to be dull. Finuala Dowling (Notes from the Dementia Ward) leads the discussion on the ways that poetry can be brought to life, for maximum insight and pleasure, with fellow poets Linda Kaomo (Badilisha Poetry X-change), Isobel Dixon (Bearings) and Wendy Woodward (A Saving Bannister).

[9] A Distant Drum (1) (Screening Room)

Jimfish

Christopher Hope shares a video recording from the Carnegie Hall performance of A Distant Drum (libretto Christopher Hope, music/score Daniel Hope and Ralf Schmid, director Jerry Mofokeng). He will also talk about the extraordinary life of Nat Nakasa, read something of his essays and tell people why they told his story and why he still matters so much.

[10] No event scheduled (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

FRIDAY 11h30-12h30

[11] South Africans entangled (New School Hall)

Endings and BeginningsLeading for Change

‘Intimacy does not guarantee respect, it does not guarantee dignity. We need nearness.’ What does this mean and how do we achieve it? Redi Tlhabi (Endings & Beginnings) asks Professor Jonathan Jansen (Leading for Change).

[12] Paying tribute to Sindiwe Magona (Old School Hall) (Free entry, but booking required)

Chasing The Tails of My Father’s Cattle

Sindiwe Magona (Chasing the Tails of My Father’s Cattle), started work as a home help; now she is one of Africa’s most prolific authors, with multiple degrees and awards under her belt. Elinor Sisulu (The Puku Children’s Literature Foundation) shares this remarkable woman’s inspiring story.

[13] Schools: Poetry for Life Competition Finals (Church Hall) (Tickets: R20) Special event, ending by 14h00

Finuala Dowling (host) and judges Isobel Dixon, Leon de Kock and Quentin Williams and Celia van Druten (accuracy), oversee the finals in this high school competition to encourage the learning of poetry by heart.

[14] Schools: Pictures worth a thousand words (Congregational Church)

Revel in the growing art of telling stories with graphic novels, comics and game development – with Geoff Burrows (Zero Degrees Games, gaming developer and designer of Among the Innocent, his first game, due for release late 2016), Lauren Beukes (The Witching Hour, The Hidden Kingdom) and Raffaella Delle Donne (Triggerfish Animation Studios). Chaired by writer/director Sam Wilson.

[15] Creating captivating children’s books (Council Chamber)

Vets and Pets: Jamie and the Magic WhistleVets en pets 2: Jamie and the horse showFolktakes from Africa

Bontle Senne, Helen Brain (Jamie and the Magic Whistle, Jamie and the Horse Show) and Marlene Winburg (Manyeka Arts Trust) share the secrets of writing, illustrating and translating for young readers. Chaired by Dianne Stewart (Folktales from Africa).

[16] Food for thought (Hospice Hall)

Raising SuperheroesReal Food - Healthy, Happy Children

Acclaimed food security writer Leonie Joubert interrogates the real issues of children, food and development, with Peninsula Feeding Scheme representative Amelia Koeries and dieticians Bridget Surtees (Raising Superheroes) and Kath Megaw (Real Food – Healthy, Happy Children).

[17] Schools: Finding your feet at varsity (Protea Hotel 1)

Your First Year Of Varsity

Shelagh Foster, co-author of Your First Year of Varsity, shares 10 ways to take the giant leap from high school to tertiary education, and to integrate, thrive, learn and live as an independent first-year student.

[18] Schools: Have you got a reading habit? (Protea Hotel 2)

Taking Chances

Reading sends you to distant lands, makes you smarter and lets you escape. Samantha Page asks children’s and young adults authors Dianne Case (The Rules), Kgauhelo Dube (Long Story SHORT) and Sicelo Kula (Taking Chances) when they started reading, why they love it and how it has directed their careers.

[19] Tell Me Sweet Something – film screening (1) (Screening Room) (Tickets: R100) Event ends at 13h30

Scriptwriter and director Akin Omotoso introduces his box office hit, a romantic comedy set in a bookshop in Johannesburg, and answers questions from the audience afterwards.

[20] No event scheduled (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

FRIDAY 13h00-14h00

[21] A matter of identity (New School Hall)

We Have Now Begun Our DescentWhat If There Were No Whites In South Africa?Critical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience

Political analyst and commentator Justice Malala (We Have Now Begun Our Descent) discusses the subtleties of identity politics in the current South African context, with City Press editor Ferial Haffajee (What If There Were No Whites in South Africa?) and philosopher Jacques Rousseau (Critical Thinking, Science and Pseudoscience).

7 May update: Justice Malala has regretfully had to withdraw from the festival for personal reasons. A new chair will be announced in due course.

[22] Breathing life into history (Old School Hall)

The Magistrate of GowerCold Case ConfessionMurderers, Miscreants and Mutineers

Chaired by Mike Wills, three very different authors, novelist Claire Robertson (The Magistrate of Gower), journalist Alex Eliseev (Cold Case Confession) and historian Nigel Penn (Murderers, Miscreants and Mutineers), tell us how they each made historic characters live again in their compelling stories.

[23] Union men (Congregational Church)

Labour columnist and journalist Terry Bell in conversation with union organiser-turned-businessman Johnny Copelyn about his memoir, The Maverick Insider.

[24] The French connection (Council Chamber)

The Frozen DeadPower Play

With John Maytham in the chair, Bernard Minier (Frozen Dead), French publisher Marie-Caroline Aubert (Éditions du Seuil) and Mike Nicol (Power Play) reveal what entices French publishers to invest in South African books.

27 April update: With regret, Marie-Caroline Aubert has had to withdraw from the festival.

[25] True Blue and other stories (Hospice Hall)

True Blue Superglue

Sunday Times Contributing Books Editor Michele Magwood and Jenny Hobbs (True Blue Superglue) talk about Jenny’s latest book, her writing life, and her time as founding member then Director of the FLF.

[26] Contemporary issues in fiction (Protea Hotel 1)

I Am No OneWhat Will People Say

SAfm’s Nancy Richards asks Nthikeng Mohlele (Pleasure), Patrick Flanery (I Am No One) and Rehana Rossouw (What Will People Say?) how their work is influenced by the real world, and what challenges they face in writing realistic fiction.

[27] The language of poetry (Protea Hotel 2)

Karin Schimke speaks to poets Mbongeni Nomkonwana, Olajumoke Verissimo and Safia Elhillo – the winner of the 2016 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets for her manuscript, Asmarani – about mining the riches of multilingualism and translation in poetry.

[28] Things we talk about (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

To Quote MyselfLet's Talk Frankly

Writer and columnist Khaya Dlanga (To Quote Myself) and media communications specialist and columnist Onkgopotse JJ Tabane (Let’s Talk Frankly) mull over the topics that grab their attention, how they write about them and the books they’ve published.

[29] Writing workshop – So, you want to be a writer? (Franschhoek Library) (Tickets: R120)
Workshop will run from 13h30-16h00

Children’s book and Young Adult writer and creative writing teacher Helen Brain makes writing exciting – and accessible to all – in this 2 1/2-hour hands-on workshop for high school learners and adults wanting to explore these genres.

FRIDAY 14h30-15h30

[30] Crossing boundaries (New School Hall)

Eugene de KockIf We Must Die

Redi Tlhabi leads a discussion with Anemari Jansen (Eugene de Kock: Assassin for the State) and If We Must Die author Stanley Manong (a former Commander of Umkhonto we Sizwe) about their books that deal with transgressions made by individuals in the name of politics.

[31] How to Save South Africa (Old School Hall)

We Have Now Begun Our DescentA Manifesto For Social Change

Justice Malala, who offered suggestions in his own book, We Have Now Begun our Descent, asks Moeletsi Mbeki about his latest book (co-written with Nobantu Mbeki), Manifesto for Social Change: How to Save South Africa.

7 May update: Justice Malala has regretfully had to withdraw from the festival for personal reasons.

[32] From book to big screen (Church Hall)

IcarusThe Griekwastad Murders

Best-selling crime writer Deon Meyer (Icarus) will be producing the film version of Jacques Steenkamp’s The Griekwastad Murders. They talk about the process of getting a book about a true crime to the big screen.

[33] The reader within (Congregational Church)

The FetchPiggy Boy's BluesSpill Simmer Falter Wither

Michele Magwood asks Finuala Dowling (The Fetch), Nakhane Touré (Piggy Boy’s Blues) and Irish writer Sara Baume (Spill Simmer Falter Wither) about the books that have formed them as writers; the ones they keep going back to for inspiration, comfort and challenge.

27 April update: With regret, Sara Baume has had to withdraw from the festival for family reasons. Anne Landsman will take her place on this panel.

[34] Emily Hobhouse and the Boer War (Council Chamber)

The War at HomeThe Compassionate Englishwoman

History professor Bill Nasson (The War at Home) in conversation with Robert Eales about his new biography of Emily Hobhouse: The Compassionate Englishwoman.

[35] Following the story (Hospice Hall)

Letters of Stone

Independent publishing consultant, editor and writer Alison Lowry speaks to Steven Robins about his extraordinary determination to find out what happened to the women in an old photograph on his family’s dining room table, an obsession which culminated in the unforgettable Letters of Stone.

[36] Crime procedural (Protea Hotel 1)

Karkloof BlueAsylum CityWasted

Jenny Crwys-Williams grills Charlotte Otter (Karkloof Blue – amateur detective), Liad Shoham (Asylum City – cop procedural) and Mark Winkler (Wasted – psycho thriller) about how they decided which approach to take, and what challenges were presented by their decision.

[37] The nature of poetry (Protea Hotel 2)

A Writer's DiaryBearingsUCT scholar Hedley Twidle discusses the themes of nature in the poetry of the late Stephen Watson (A Writer’s Diary) with Isobel Dixon and her new collection, Bearings.

[38] Blood Lions – documentary screening (1) (Screening Room) (Tickets: R100) Event ends at about 16h30

Blood Lions follows acclaimed environmental journalist and safari operator Ian Michler, and Rick Swazey, an American hunter, on their journey to uncover the realities about the multi-million dollar predator breeding and canned lion hunting industries in South Africa. Ian Michler will introduce the screening and answer questions afterwards.

[39] Has post-apartheid literature lost the plot? (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

Wamuwi Mbao and Leon de Kock in conversation about the state of fiction in post-apartheid South Africa.

FRIDAY 16h00-17h00

[40] What is business as usual in Africa? (New School Hall)

Africa is Open for BusinessHow South Africa WorksThe Looting Machine

Victor Kgomoeswana (Africa is Open for Business) interrogates the challenges of development, foreign investment and entrepreneurship across the continent, with Greg Mills (How South Africa Works) and Tom Burgis (The Looting Machine).

[41] Witnessing history (Old School Hall)

JimfishThe Sword and the PenJan Smuts

FLF founding director Christopher Hope (Jimfish) in discussion with former Rand Daily Mail editor Allister Sparks (The Sword and the Pen) and former editor-in-chief of The Star Richard Steyn (Jan Smuts: Unafraid of Greatness) about the historic events they covered during their tenures, at the height of apartheid and the Struggle.

[42] From first lines to last (Church Hall)

The Magistrate of GowerThe RaftThe End of Mr Y

Victor Dlamini opens the pages of the books of Claire Robertson, Fred Strydom and Scarlett Thomas and asks them to share how they settle on their opening and ending words, how they allow theirs stories to develop, and to reveal their favourite first and last lines from other writers.

[43] Writing, hearing, playing – and all that jazz (Congregational Church)

To Catch A CopStill GrazingNegroland

Marianne Thamm shares an interlude with jazz legend Hugh Masekela (Still Grazing) and Pulitzer Prize-winning American critic Margo Jefferson (Negroland) as they discuss the fusion of jazz, life and memoirs.

27 April update: With regret, Margo Jefferson has had to withdraw from the festival for family reasons.

[44] Traditional publishing in the spotlight (Council Chamber)

Arthur Attwell asks Bridget Impey (Jacana), Marie-Caroline Aubert (Le Seuil, France) and Terry Morris (Pan Macmillan) about the business challenges faced by contemporary publishers, and the mid- to long-term prospects of the book industry.

27 April update: With regret, Marie-Caroline Aubert has had to withdraw from the festival.

[45] Writers of few(er) words (Hospice Hall)

Invisible OthersWaterStationsAffluenza

Karina Szczurek chats to Mark Winkler (“Ink”), Nick Mulgrew (Stations) and Niq Mhlongo (Affluenza) about the art of keeping it short while ensuring impact.

[46] Finding your first story (Protea Hotel 1)

A Slim, Green SilenceUnder the Udala TreesAn Imperfect Blessing

Karabo Kgoleng explores the writing process of two first-time novelists, Beverly Rycroft (A Slim, Green Silence) and Chinelo Okparanta (Under the Udala Trees) and Nadia Davids (An Imperfect Blessing).

[47] Hip-hop happening (Protea Hotel 2)

Bare and BreakingStatic

Poetry has a long history of being studied, pulled apart and put together. Karin Schimke asks Dr Quentin Williams and Prof. Adam Haupt (UCT) why hip-hop hasn’t been given the same degree of academic scrutiny and if it was, what would it show us about ourselves and our society?

[48] If you don’t laugh … (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

One Midlife Crisis and a SpeedoBest White and Other Anxious Delusions

Humans tend to find humour in the bleakest and craziest situations. Darrel Bristow-Bovey (The Big Read columns) and Rebecca Davis (Best White and Other Anxious Delusions) explore and celebrate the phenomenon of finding and writing the ridiculous, the moving, the funny stories and experiences that keep us sane.

FRIDAY Evening

17h30-19h30

[48a] Poetry at Essence (Free entry)

Festival poets appearing on the FLF poetry programme, as well as other featured voices, read from and perform their work at Essence restaurant. Bar and dining menu available – book a table at the restaurant if you plan to have dinner as space is limited (021 876 4135).

18h00 for 18h30

[48b] An Evening of Tales & Tastings (Allora Restaurant) (Tickets: R200)

The Sunday Times and Penguin Random House invite you to a relaxed evening of readings by top authors, accompanied by Porcupine Ridge wines and light food.

To book email: NtshudisaneT@timesmedia.co.za

18h30-19h30

[49] What was that?! (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

The RaftBroken MonstersDark Windows

It’s Friday the 13th and haunting stories are created as Amabookabooka scaremaster Jonathan Ancer stirs the imaginations of his victims, Fred Strydom, Lauren Beukes and Louis Greenberg, through creepy sounds that inspire chilling storylines – on the fly. Heavy breathing, eerie footsteps, blood curdling screams, brewing storms … be afraid. Be very afraid.

From 19h00

[50] Tell Me Sweet Something – film screening (2) (Screening Room) (Tickets: R100) Event ends at 21h00

Scriptwriter and director Akin Omotoso introduces his box office hit, a romantic comedy set in a bookshop in Johannesburg, and answers questions from the audience afterwards.

[50a] Autumn Music Weekend Concert 1: Highly Strung: Guitar and Piano Duo (NG Church)

(Tickets: R100 at the door or book directly on Webtickets.)

Guitarist James Grace joins Christopher Duigan in a popular selection of favourites from this exciting and innovative duo’s repertoire – classical, jazz, pop and standards.

19h00

[50b] Pay Back the Curry! (Church Hall) (Tickets: R100)

In the tradition of the three editions of the awarding-winning Bafana Republic satirical revue which all started their lives at Franschhoek Literary Festivals (2007-2009), Mike van Graan’s Pay Back the Curry! will have its first public outing at this year’s Festival! Produced by Siv Ngesi and directed by Rob van Vuuren. Pay Back the Curry! features the multi-talented Daniel Richards performing a range of satirical sketches on all things contemporary, from sparrows and statues to Zuptas and zombies! The one-off show is part of the revue’s development, and audience members will be invited to provide anonymous written feedback to the show.

SATURDAY 14 MAY

SATURDAY 10h00-11h00

[51] Travel writing workshop (Franschhoek Library) (Tickets: R120) Note: workshop time 09h00-11h00

Sunday Times travel writer Paul Ash guides would be travel writers/bloggers along the path of writing their own travel stories, following in the footsteps of literature’s best travel books and journalism, and offering directions that will stand them in good stead as they embark on a new journey.

[52] Closing cases (New School Hall)

Cold Case ConfessionEugene de KockThe Griekwastad Murders

Judge Dennis Davis asks Alex Eliseev (Cold Case Confession), Anemari Jansen (Eugene de Kock) and Jacques Steenkamp (The Griekwastad Murders) about the challenges facing investigators when piecing a case together, the quality of the evidence, and what happens when no progress is made.

[53] Conversations at the white dinner table (Old School Hall)

Critical Thinking, Science, and PseudoscienceTo Catch A Cop

Do white people have serious conversations about whiteness, or do they simply ask black people what they should “do” to correct the injustices of the past – and present? With Jacques Rousseau (Critical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience) at the head of the table, Ian Currie (academic and student activist), Marianne Thamm (author, columnist and political commentator) and Peter Bruce (Editor in Chief, BDFM) tell the truth as they know it.

[54] ‘This is how it was …’ (Church Hall)

Chasing The Tails of My Father’s CattleSpill Simmer Falter Wither

Victor Dlamini is joined by Javier Perez (Lingua Franca Spoken Word Movement), Sindiwe Magona (Chasing the Tails of my Father’s Cattle) and Irish author, Sarah Baume (Spill Simmer Falter Wither), in exploring the rich traditions and the global origins of fiction in oral storytelling.

27 April update: With regret, Sara Baume has had to withdraw from the festival for family reasons.

[55] Getting South Africans excited about reading (Congregational Church)

Nancy Richards (print and radio journalist) chairs Kgauhelo Dube (Long Story SHORT), Mignon Hardie (FunDza) and Roscoe Williams (Read to Rise) in a discussion on the state of reading culture in SA; why and how reading enriches lives; and what they are doing to encourage children and adults alike to fall in love with reading.

[56] Women’s journeys in fiction (Council Chamber)

The YearningNotes From the Lost Property DepartmentAn Imperfect Blessing

Palesa Morudu (Cover2Cover) takes Mohale Mashigo (The Yearning), Nadia Davids (An Imperfect Blessing) and Bridgett Pitt (Notes from the Lost Property Department) through the personal journeys of their protagonists and secondary characters, focusing on how the authors created these compelling and credible women.

[57] Criminal boundaries (Hospice Hall)

IcarusThe Frozen DeadAsylum City

From farm attacks to evil plots and bungling cops, Deon Meyer (Icarus) asks Karin Brynard (Our Fathers), French author Bernard Minier (The Frozen Dead) and Israeli author Liad Shoham (Asylum City) about crossing national or international, moral or political boundaries in sourcing and developing their plots.

[58] Food in fiction (Protea Hotel 1)

Anna Peters' Year of Cooking DangerouslyDeath By CarbsRecipes for Love and Murder: A Tannie Maria Mystery

Just as language is a barometer of our times, so is what we eat – and how it ends up on the pages of our fiction, whether as a plot device, a symbol or as a way to laugh at ourselves. Kathryn White (Anna Peters’ Year of Cooking Dangerously), Paige Nick (Death by Carbs) and Sally Andrew (Recipes for Love and Murder) sit down with Michele Magwood to share some titbits.

[59] ‘Summarising life’ (Protea Hotel 2)

Notes from the Dementia WardBare and Breaking

Starting with the title of a poem by Finuala Dowling (Notes from the Dementia Ward), Karin Schimke asks Dowling and Sudanese/American poet Safia Elhillo – the winner of the 2016 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets for her manuscript, Asmarani – about writing poetry that reflects on life and home.

[60] Blood Lions – documentary screening (2) (Screening Room) (Tickets: R100) Event ends at about 12h00

Blood Lions follows acclaimed environmental journalist and safari operator Ian Michler and Rick Swazey, an American hunter, on their journey to uncover the realities about the multi-million dollar predator breeding and canned lion hunting industries in South Africa. Ian Michler will introduce the screening and answer questions afterwards.

[61] Stealing the World Cup (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

Mike Wills uncovers the story behind how South Africa won the bid to host the 2010 World Cup as told in a new book by Ray Hartley, The Big Fix: How South Africa Stole the World Cup.

SATURDAY 11h30-12h30

[62] What is China doing in Africa? (New School Hall)

Continental ShiftA Manifesto For Social ChangeThe Looting Machine

Richard Poplak (co-author with Kevin Bloom Continental Shift: A Journey Into Africa’s Changing Fortunes) explores the implications of China’s growing presence on the continent, with Kevin Bloom, Moeletsi Mbeki (Manifesto for Social Change: How to Save South Africa) and Tom Burgis (The Looting Machine).

[63] Can entrepreneurs be made? (Old School Hall)

Raising the BarHow South Africa WorksInnovationAfrica is Open for Business

Innovation, policies, attitude – what is needed from and for South African entrepreneurs? Songezo Zibi asks the questions of Greg Mills (How South Africa Works), Sarah Wild (Innovation: Shaping South Africa through Science) and Victor Kgomoeswana (Africa is Open for Business).

[64] The men behind the headlines (Church Hall)

The Sword and the PenGod, Spies and LiesRagged Glory

Allister Sparks (The Sword and the Pen: Six Decades on the Political Frontier) and John Matisonn (God, Spies and Lies) speak to Ray Hartley (editor Rand Daily Mail online) about writing their own stories after years of reporting those of others.

[65] Remembering the elephants (Congregational Church)

Gang TownGiant Steps

Don Pinnock in conversation with fellow conservationist and author Richard Peirce about his new book, Giant Steps, tracing the journeys and fates of several elephants, from the Lowveld to the southern Cape coast.

[66] In conversation… (Council Chamber)

Everyday Matters

Harry Garuba (UCT Centre for African Studies) speaks to Margaret Daymond (Everyday Matters: Selected Letters of Dora Taylor, Bessie Head and Lilian Ngoyi) about three pioneering South African women whose own stories of struggle, exile and endeavour are depicted in their personal letters.

[67] Writing relationships (Hospice Hall)

Under the Udala TreesInvisible Others

Chinelo Okparanta (Under the Udala Trees), David Cornwell (Like It Matters) and Nthikeng Mohlele (Pleasure) get to the heart of how writers depict love, sex, and friendship through their characters. Chaired by Karina Szczurek (Invisible Others).

[68] Knowing when to stop (Protea Hotel 1)

White WahalaDying in New YorkAffluenzaImperfect Solo

Ekow Duker (White Wahala, Dying in New York) leads Fred Strydom (The Raft), Niq Mhlongo (Affluenza) and Steven Boykey Sidley (Imperfect Solo) in a conversation on structure, length and plot. How do authors decide on the end point of a novel, and how do they lead a story to its natural conclusion?

[69] Speaking up or writing down (Protea Hotel 2)

Primrose Mrwebi speaks with fellow poets Blaq Pearl, Isobel Dixon and Olajumoke Verissimo on the differing styles and delivery of spoken and written poetry.

[70] South Africa’s sports quota wars (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

Deliberate Concealment

With Peter Bruce in the chair, sports writer Mark Keohane and Mtutuzeli Nyoka (Deliberate Concealment) unpick the inside stories of racial quotas in sporting codes.

SATURDAY 11h30

[70a] Autumn music weekend Concert 2: The Genius of Chopin (NG Church) (Tickets: R100 at the door or from Webtickets directly)

Christopher Duigan plays piano music by Frederic Chopin including the Ballade No. 3, Waltzes, Nocturnes and Scherzo No. 1.

SATURDAY 13h00-14h00

[71] Dearth Day? (New School Hall)

BlackoutThe Hungry SeasonScorched

Conservation writer Ian Michler turns to environmental expert Chris Hartnady (Umvoto Africa – environmental resource management) and authors James-Brent Styan (Blackout: The Eskom Crisis) and Leonie Joubert (The Hungry Season, Scorched) for their take on South Africa’s natural resource challenges.

[72] Can we claim to be intersectional? (Old School Hall)

Using gender as a point of departure, this panel (for whom the protests – police antagonism, intense media scrutiny, academic disruption – were a lived experience) reflects on and analyses the experiences of students involved in the protest movements across SA universities in 2015. With Ian Currie (Wits), Julie Nxadi (UWC) and Simone Cupido (SU), chaired by Nomboniso Gasa.

[73] In conversation … (Church Hall)

Still GrazingPiggy Boy's Blues

Journalist and social commentator Victor Dlamini talks music, performance, writing and life – with SA music icon Hugh Masekela (Still Grazing) and rising star Nakhane Touré (Piggy Boy’s Blues).

[74] André Brink Memorial Lecture (Congregational Church)

Karina Szczurek welcomes you to the second annual lecture in honour of her late husband André Brink, and will introduce Sindiwe Magona (prolific author and writer-in-residence, University of the Western Cape). She will offer an outsider’s take on this giant of South African letters in a talk titled “André Brink: enigma, betrayer, villain or hero?”

[75] Distinctly Afrikaaps (Council Chamber)

Afrikaans and Nederlands lecturer Anastasia de Vries (UWC) speaks to the Head of Curriculum Studies at SU, Dr Michael le Cordeur about language in education, with particular emphasis on the history, role and future of Afrikaaps as a distinct African language in its own right.

[76] 10 years of the FLF (Hospice Hall) (free event, booking required)

With Alison Lowry in the chair, FLF founders Christopher Hope, Jenny Hobbs and Sheenagh Tyler share the delights and challenges of creating, growing and managing one of South Africa’s most successful literary festivals.

Sigh The Beloved CountryNegroland

[77] Are cultural journalists an endangered species? (Protea Hotel 1)

Radio broadcaster and Fleur du Cap Awards judge Africa Melane discusses the role and state of cultural journalism in the world today with cultural journalist Bongani Madondo (Sigh the Beloved Country), Pulitzer Prize-winning cultural critic Margo Jefferson (Negroland) and Michele Magwood (2015 SALA Literary Journalism award winner).

27 April update: With regret, Margo Jefferson has had to withdraw from the festival for family reasons. Theatre critic Tracey Saunders will join the panel in her place.

[78] Is poetry an ‘ingenious nonsense’? (Protea Hotel 2)

Matric RageThe Myth of This Is That We're All in This Together

English classical scholar and mathematician Isaac Barrow (1630-1677) described poetry as “a kind of ingenious nonsense”. Poets Genna Gardini, Nick Mulgrew and Safia Elhillo – the winner of the 2016 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets for her manuscript, Asmarani – debate the meaning and truth of his words. With Finuala Dowling in the chair.

[79] Tell Me Sweet Something – film screening (3) (Screening Room) (Tickets: R100) Event ends at 15h00

Scriptwriter and director Akin Omotoso introduces his box office hit, a romantic comedy set in a bookshop in Johannesburg, and answers questions from the audience afterwards.

[80] Tall tales (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

To Quote MyselfPens Behaving Badly

With literary journalist Karabo Kgoleng in the chair, columnist and author Khaya Dlanga (To Quote Myself) and Paige Nick (Pens Behaving Badly) talk about imagination, embellishment and the other characteristics of powerful, mostly/sometimes true, stories.

SATURDAY 14h30-15h30

[81] The freedoms that matter (New School Hall)

Democracy - More Than Just ElectionsWhat If There Were No Whites In South Africa?A Manifesto For Social Change

Free press, free market, free votes: Judge Dennis Davis asks Brigalia Bam (Democracy: More Than Just Elections), City Press editor Ferial Haffajee and political economist Moeletsi Mbeki about the systems and structures that are needed to protect South Africa’s democracy.

[82] Life in Exile (Old School Hall)

Fordsburg FighterIf We Must Die

Amin Cajee (Fordsburg Fighter: The Journey of an MK Volunteer) and Stanley Manong (If We Must Die) share their stories of the turbulence of life in political exile and how this influences who and what they are today. With Justice Malala in the chair.

7 May update: Justice Malala has regretfully had to withdraw from the festival for personal reasons. Palesa Morudu will chair this panel in his place.

[83] Seeds of the imagination (Church Hall)

One Midlife Crisis and a SpeedoKarkloof BlueThe Seed ThiefThe Seed Collectors

Tended by Darrel Bristow-Bovey, Charlotte Otter (Karkloof Blue), Jacqui L’Ange (The Seed Thief) and Scarlett Thomas (The Seed Collectors) tell us how story ideas are nurtured into fully-grown novels, about the stories that bolted and had to be pruned, and those that bloomed beyond all expectation.

[84] South Africa at war (Congregational Church)

The War at HomeWorld War One and the People of South AfricaA Military History of Modern South AfricaIn Enemy HandsJan Smuts

Bill Nasson (The War at Home: Women and families in the Anglo-Boer War and World War One and the People of South Africa) considers the 20th century wars that South Africa took part in, with Ian van der Waag (A Military History of Modern South Africa), Karen Horn (In Enemy Hands: South Africa’s POWS in World War II) and Richard Steyn (Jan Smuts: Unafraid of Greatness).

[85] Cape of Gangs (Council Chamber)

Gang Town

Dr Elrena van der Spuy (Centre of Criminology, UCT) speaks to criminologist and author Don Pinnock about his new book, Gang Town, in which he investigates, analyses and proposes solutions to the causes and challenges of gangsterism in the Western Cape.

[86] Language and character in literature (Hospice Hall)

The FetchThe Magistrate of GowerWhat Will People Say

Finuala Dowling (The Fetch), Claire Robertson (The Magistrate of Gower) and Rehana Rossouw (What Will People Say?) discuss with Harry Garuba how they structure, style and write the language of their characters; how they shape and differentiate these characters through dialogue, keeping them distinct and making them distinctive.

[87] Lots in translation (Protea Hotel 1)

As our need for bi- and multi-literacy grows, so does the need for sensitive translations. From copyright, technical and design issues, to nuance and colloquialisms, translating is a specialised craft. With publisher Arthur Attwell in the chair, translator Catherine du Toit and biliteracy development specialist Xolisa Guzula share their experiences and understanding of this expanding market.

[88] Poets in performance (Protea Hotel 2)

Primrose Mrwebi leads Blaq Pearl, Katleho Shoro and Quentin Williams in a special hour of performance poetry in practice.

[89] The horror, the horror (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

The Frozen DeadBroken MonstersUnder Ground

John Maytham asks Bernard Minier (Frozen Dead), Lauren Beukes (Broken Monsters) and Louis Greenberg (co-writer with Sarah Lotz, as SL Grey, Under Ground) about what it takes to scare the living daylights out of readers, why they do it, and whether they scare themselves in the process.

SATURDAY 16h00-17h00

[90] The Forensics Face-off (New School Hall)

Fruit of a Poisoned TreeBloody LiesTo Catch A Cop

The Inge Lotz murder case fascinated and divided South Africans as it threw up claims of police incompetence and legal privilege, evidence tampering and emotional bias. Two opponents, each convinced – and convincing – in their presentation of diametrically opposed interpretations of the evidence, Antony Altbeker (Fruit of a Poisoned Tree) and Thomas Mollett (Bloody Lies, Bloody Lies Too), will debate the merits of their respective positions, with Marianne Thamm caught between them.

[91] The reporting business (Old School Hall)

Raising the BarThe Looting Machine

Mike Wills ask economics and business journalists and editors Claire Bisseker (economics editor, Financial Mail), Songezo Zibi (former editor Business Day) and Tom Burgis (Financial Times investigations correspondent) about the challenges and responsibilities of reporting about the economy and business in a changing world, from the nitty gritty of stock markets to the big stories and how they are covered.

[92] Plain speaking (Church Hall)

Best White and Other Anxious DelusionsHoly CowsLet's Talk FranklyUntil Julius Comes

Rebecca Davis (Best White and Other Anxious Delusions) quizzes fellow columnists and commentators Gareth van Onselen (Holy Cows), Onkgopotse JJ Tabane (Let’s Talk Frankly) and Richard Poplak (Until Julius Comes) about how they tackle contentious subjects, trolls and targets on their backs.

[93] In conversation … (Congregational Church)

27 April update: With regret, Margo Jefferson has had to withdraw from the festival for family reasons. Details of a replacement or new event in this time slot will follow.

Endings and BeginningsNegroland

Redi Tlhabi (Endings & Beginnings) and Margo Jefferson (Negroland) share thoughts on the process of writing their own stories – structuring and plotting the story of a life, knowing where to start and end, and the use of dialogue and narrative to represent their reality.

[94] Translating lives (Council Chamber)

Flame in the Snow

Victor Dlamini in conversation with Leon de Kock about his contribution to the translation of André Brink’s letters to Ingrid Jonker, as published in Flame in the Snow.

[95] Creative writing techniques (Hospice Hall)

The Magistrate of GowerPiggy Boy's BluesSpill Simmer Falter Wither

Is technique deliberate, schooled and planned or does it simply flow from the mind to the fingertips? Publishing consultant and editor/writer Karabo Kgoleng leads Claire Robertson, Nakhane Touré and Sara Baume in a conversation about what works, what doesn’t, how their own writing techniques were formed and developed, and how they keep themselves creative and inspired.

27 April update: With regret, Sara Baume has had to withdraw from the festival for family reasons.

[96] What a LARP (Protea Hotel 1)

The Goblet ClubDark Poppy's Demise

Live Action Role Play (LARP) writers Roxy Kawitzky (performance artist and postgraduate researcher in gaming and roleplay) and Simon Ratcliffe (co-facilitator of SA’s largest LARP group) in discussion with young adult author, Sally Partridge (The Goblet Club, Dark Poppy’s Demise) on storytelling through LARP.

[97] Writer on the couch (Protea Hotel 2)

Signs for an Exhibition

Neuropsychologist Mark Solms puts poet Eliza Kentridge (Signs for an Exhibition) on the couch to ask what drove her to become a writer, how does the mind of a writer differ from a “normal” mortal, and what are the psychological effects of exploring a life through writing?

[98] A Distant Drum (2) (Screening Room)

Christopher Hope shares a video recording from the Carnegie Hall performance of A Distant Drum (libretto Christopher Hope, music/score Daniel Hope and Ralf Schmid, director Jerry Mofokeng). He will also talk about the extraordinary life of Nat Nakasa, read something of his essays and tell people why they told his story and why he still matters so much.

[99] Page, stage, screen (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

Dark WindowsImperfect Solo

With Africa Melane in the chair, Akin Omotoso (actor, writer and director), Louis Greenberg (author) and Steven Boykey Sidley (author, playwright) reveal the challenges and rewards of writing for diverse media. Do some authors write with a movie in mind; what does having one’s work adapted to the screen mean to an author and how involved can/should an author be in the process?

SATURDAY evening events

17h15

[99a] Ingrid Jonker Prize announcement (Council Chamber) (Free entry)

The Ingrid Jonker Prize is awarded in alternate years to the best debut collections of poetry in English or Afrikaans. In 2016 the prize will be awarded to the best collection published in English in the two preceding years (2014 and 2015) at a special event during the Franschhoek Literary Festival.

17h30

[100] Literary madness with John Maytham, compiled by Finuala Dowling (Congregational Church) (Tickets: R100)

From Hamlet to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, John Maytham presents an hour of dramatic, funny, poignant and frightening evocations of madness drawn from some of the world’s most brilliant texts. In compiling the script, Finuala Dowling has sought out memorable extracts from writers – including Woolf, Jung, Winterson and O’Neill – whose best works are lit up by the author’s intimate understanding of what it is like to live within a disordered mind.

18h00

[101] InZync poets in performance (Old School Hall) (Free entry, booking required)

Adrian “Diff” van Wyk and the InZync poets present an evening of performance poetry.

18h30

[101a] Sunday Times Literary Awards shortlist announcement (Allora Restaurant) (By invitation only)

19h00

[102] Tell Me Sweet Something – film screening (4) (Screening Room) (Tickets: R100) Event ends 21h00

Scriptwriter and director Akin Omotoso introduces his box office hit, a romantic comedy set in a bookshop in Johannesburg, and answers questions from the audience afterwards.

19h00

[102a] Autumn music weekend Concert 3: Candlelight Soirée (Café Bon Bon) (Tickets: R550, includes a three-course meal)

Christopher Duigan repeats his Chopin selection along with music by Liszt and Debussy.

Bookings: Café Bon Bon 021 876 3936.

19h00 for 19h30

[102b] Dinner with The Book Show host Jenny Crwys-Williams (Pierneef á La Motte)

Enjoy Jenny’s private dinner with some of the cream of the Festival authors in one of SA’s top restaurants, with Porcupine Ridge wines. Authors at all tables, party atmosphere, great winelands food.

Bookings: email bookings@jennyandco.co.za or phone 011 442 8993.

SUNDAY 15 MAY

10h00-11h00

[103] The road ahead, together (New School Hall)

What If There Were No Whites In South Africa?We Have Now Begun Our Descent

With Ferial Haffajee (editor, City Press) in the chair, Justice Malala (We Have Now Begun Our Descent) and Peter Bruce (editor-in-chief of BDFM) discuss what needs to happen for South Africa to overcome the current challenges we face.

7 May update: Justice Malala has regretfully had to withdraw from the festival for personal reasons.

[104] First books (Old School Hall)

Arctic SummerSpill Simmer Falter Wither

Award-winning South African playwright and novelist Damon Galgut asks two first-time authors, David Cornwell (Like it Matters) and Irish author Sara Baume (Spill Simmer Falter Wither) about the challenges and rewards of penning their first novels.

27 April update: With regret, Sara Baume has had to withdraw from the festival for family reasons.

[105] Brains trust (Congregational Church)

Critical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience

CapeTalk presenter John Maytham asks Jacques Rousseau (Critical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience: Why We Can’t Trust Our Brains) about politics, religion, science and thinking critically.

[106] A nine-year journey (Council Chamber)

Continental Shift

Mike Wills chairs a discussion with Kevin Bloom and Richard Poplak about their nine-year collaboration that has resulted in their new book, Continental Shift: A Journey Into Africa’s Changing Fortunes.

[107] The transformers (Hospice Hall)

Four women are making inroads into transforming the literary system: led by Cover2Cover publisher Palesa Morudu, Christine Qunta (Why We Are not a Nation; publisher Seriti sa Sechaba), Elinor Sisulu (Puku Children’s Literature Foundation) and Thabiso Mahlape (publisher, BlackBird Books) speak about how they are overcoming the challenges they face.

[108] In conversation … (Protea Hotel 1)

Sigh The Beloved Country

Author and political commentator Marianne Thamm in conversation with Bongani Madondo (Sigh the Beloved Country), about his new collection of essays.

[109] ‘The ears of my ears awake’ (Protea Hotel 2)

Bare and BreakingBearings

Channeling the words of e.e. cummings, Karin Schimke (Bare & Breaking) in discussion with poets Isobel Dixon (Bearings), Khadija Heeger and Primrose Mrwebi about their moment of first “hearing” poetry – when their ears were opened to the magic of poetry, and how it inspired them to write their own poems.

[110] A Distant Drum (3) (Screening Room)

Christopher Hope shares a video recording from the Carnegie Hall performance of A Distant Drum (libretto Christopher Hope, music/score Daniel Hope and Ralf Schmid, director Jerry Mofokeng). He will also talk about the extraordinary life of Nat Nakasa, read something of his essays and tell people why they told his story and why he still matters so much.

[111] Kinking Reality and Twisty Fiction (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

Fantastical storytelling is at its most potent when it’s anchored to reality. Lauren Beukes talks about why she writes strange and twisty fiction from novels to comics to TV shows and how storytelling that re-imagines where we are has the ability to tell us more about who we are. TED-style talk. With visuals.

SUNDAY 11h30-12h30

[112] Do you understand the South African economy? (New School Hall)

God, Spies and LiesHow South Africa WorksA Manifesto For Social Change

John Matisonn (God, Spies and Lies: Finding South Africa’s Future Through its Past) gets to grips with South Africa’s complex and precarious economy, with Greg Mills (How South Africa Works) and Moeletsi Mbeki (A Manifesto For Social Change: How To Save South Africa).

[113] As I recall (Old School Hall)

NegrolandChasing The Tails of My Father’s Cattle

Gender activist Nomboniso Gasa speaks to lifelong writers and memoirists Margo Jefferson and Sindiwe Magona about the motivation and experience of sharing their lives through story.

27 April update: With regret, Margo Jefferson has had to withdraw from the festival for family reasons.

[114] Tales of the cities (Church Hall)

The Emergence of the South African Metropolis

John Maytham speaks to historian Vivian Bickford-Smith (The Emergence of the South African Metropolis) about the fascinating histories and landscapes of the cities of South Africa.

22 March update: With regret, Zahira Asmal is no longer able to be part of this event.

[115] Lecture: Marking the centenary of the 1916 Easter Uprising in Ireland (Congregational Church)

It is not uncommon for historians of Ireland to point to the symbolic importance of South Africa’s Anglo-Boer War of 1899-1902 for Irish history. South African historian Professor Bill Nasson (SU) considers this link in a lecture first presented in Dublin, “Unbalanced emotionalism or republican romance: The 1916 Easter Rising in South African Eyes”.

[116] Literary letters (Council Chamber)

Everyday MattersFlame in the Snow

Finuala Dowling chairs a discussion with Margaret Daymond (Everyday Matters: Selected letters of Dora Taylor, Bessie Head and Lilian Ngoyi), Karin Schimke (Flame in the Snow) and Karina Szczurek (Flame in the Snow), about what the personal correspondence of significant figures reveals about their writing, themes and lives.

[117] Journos writing books (Hospice Hall)

Best White and Other Anxious DelusionsThe Magistrate of GowerWhat Will People Say

Rebecca Davis in the chair, asks fellow journalist-cum-authors Claire Robertson and Rehana Rossouw how long it took them to begin writing fiction, how the skills required for each form differ, or don’t, and how they combine their day jobs with writing novels.

[118] Murder, she wrote (Protea Hotel 1)

Recipes for Love and Murder: A Tannie Maria MysteryHour of Darkness

How do crime writers plan their murders, weaving plots and subplots – and develop characters that readers can’t get enough of? French and South African crime fiction specialist Catherine du Toit investigates, with Sally Andrew (Recipes for Love and Murder), Karin Brynard (Our Fathers) and Michéle Rowe (Hour of Darkness).

[119] The personal journey of poetry (Protea Hotel 2)

The Myth of This Is That We're All in This TogetherA Slim, Green Silence

Nick Mulgrew explores the many paths that poets take in their writing, with Bev Rycroft (A Slim, Green Silence) and Eliza Kentridge (Signs for an Exhibition).

[120] Blood Lions – documentary screening (3) (Screening Room) (Tickets: R100) Event ends at about 13h30

Blood Lions follows acclaimed environmental journalist and safari operator Ian Michler and Rick Swazey, an American hunter, on their journey to uncover the realities about the multimillion dollar predator breeding and canned lion hunting industries in South Africa. Director Bruce Young will introduce the screening and answer questions afterwards.

[121] But is it cricket? (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

Deliberate Concealment

André Odendaal (former Western Province Cricket CEO) in conversation with Mtutuzeli Nyoka (Deliberate Concealment) on the repercussions of the Cricket SA scandal, its impact on South African cricket today, and the author’s fight to uncover the truth.

SUNDAY 11h30

[121a] Autumn music weekend Concert 4: Mozart and Beethoven with the Juliet String Quartet (NG Church)

The exciting new Juliet Quartet play Beethoven’s String Quartet Op 18 and Mozart’s Piano Concerto in A K.414 with Christopher Duigan (piano).

Tickets: R100, pay at the door or book directly on Webtickets.

SUNDAY 13h00-14h00

[122] “I can’t find us …” (New School Hall)

Sigh The Beloved CountryStill Grazing

Bongani Madondo asks Christine Qunta (Why We Are not a Nation) and Hugh Masekela (Hugh Masekela Heritage Foundation) about the importance of traditional and cultural values in contemporary South African life.

[123] Sex on the page (Old School Hall)

Anna Peters' Year of Cooking DangerouslyDutch CourageA Girl Walks into a BarThe Seed Collectors

Jenny Crwys-Williams gets between the covers with Kathryn White (Anna Peters’ Year of Cooking Dangerously), Paige Nick (Dutch Courage and co-author of A Girls Walk Into … erotica series) and Scarlett Thomas (The Seed Collectors) to ask about the ups and downs of writing sex scenes; their best sex scenes in other books, plus those they’re glad they never wrote.

[124] Writers’ secret lives (Church Hall)

One Midlife Crisis and a SpeedoIcarusTribe

Some writers make it look so easy, but is it? These authors share their stories of what it’s really like to write, and whether the rewards are worth it. With Darrel Bristow-Bovey in the chair, and Deon Meyer (Icarus), Jolyn Phillips (Tjieng Tjang Tjerrie and Other Stories), and Rahla Xenopoulos (Tribe) on the panel.

[125] The past is never past (Congregational Church)

Ragged GloryEugene de KockJan Smuts

Richard Steyn (Jan Smuts: Unafraid of Greatness), Anemari Jansen (Eugene de Kock: Assassin for the State) and John Matisonn (God, Spies and Lies) explore how the acts of famous, notorious, and significant people from the recent past reverberate today.

24 March update: With regret, Ray Hartley is no longer able to be part of this event.

[126] In conversation … (Council Chamber)

Democracy

Elinor Sisulu in conversation with Brigalia Bam about her years at the Independent Electoral Commission, and the book she’s published about her experiences, Democracy: More than Just Elections.

[127] Breaking the barrier (Hospice Hall)

JimfishBearingsBroken MonstersAffluenza

Christopher Hope asks publishing agent Isobel Dixon (Blake Friedman), and South African authors Lauren Beukes and Niq Mhlongo (Affluenza) what it takes to get a book published in the global market.

27 April update: With regret, Marie-Caroline Aubert has had to withdraw from the festival. Lauren Beukes will take her place on this panel.

[128] Writing from the outside (Protea Hotel 1)

Under the Udala TreesDying in New YorkI Am No One

Alison Lowry explores the perspectives gained by writers who are based outside their home country. Do they write about that country or about their new homes, the people of their past or their present – and what influences these decisions? with Chinelo Okparanta (Under the Udala Trees), Ekow Duker (Dying in New York) and Patrick Flanery (I am No One).

[129] Young voices from around the world (Protea Hotel 2)

Beyond the Delivery Room

Khadija Heeger (Beyond the Delivery Room) discusses the new face and faces of contemporary poetry with Katleho Shoro (South Africa), Olajumoke Verissimo (Nigeria) and Safia Elhillo (Sudan/USA) – the winner of the 2016 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets for her manuscript, Asmarani.

[130] Back to the future (Elephant & Barrel, upstairs)

The Hungry SeasonInnovationGang Town

Science journalists and visionaries Leonie Joubert and Sarah Wild live in 2036, in a world we’re busy creating in 2016. Investigative journalist Don Pinnock visits them to find out what life in South Africa is like then.

SUNDAY 13h00

[130a] Autumn music weekend Concert 5: Tango del Fuego (Café Bon Bon)

Cape Town Tango Ensemble players Stanislav Angelov (accordion) and Petrus de Beer (violin) join Christopher Duigan in a spirited tango music performance.

Bookings: Café Bon Bon (021) 876-3936.Tickets: R500, including a three-course meal.

Book details

  • Critical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience: Why We Can’t Trust Our Brains by Caleb W Lack, Jacques Rousseau
    EAN: 9780826194190
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  • Critical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience: Why We Can’t Trust Our Brains by Caleb W Lack, Jacques Rousseau
    EAN: 9780826194190
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  • Critical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience: Why We Can’t Trust Our Brains by Caleb W Lack, Jacques Rousseau
    EAN: 9780826194190
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  • The Emergence of the South African Metropolis: Cities and Identities in the Twentieth Century by Vivian Bickford-Smith
    EAN: 9781107002937
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New Faces at the Franschhoek Literary Festival

Two of the top international authors coming to the 2014 Franschhoek Literary Festival are Thomas Keneally, author of Schindler’s List, and top Israeli writer Shifra Horn.

This year’s festival takes place between 16 and 18 May.

Tamara Walks on WaterSchindler's List

Keneally, who hails from Australia, is best known for his Booker Prize-winning novel Schindler’s List, which Steven Spielberg adapted into an award-winning film.

Keneally has published 56 other titles, including novels, non-fiction and children’s books, and is an outspoken doyen of wordsmiths with a huge sense of humour, who has wowed literary festivals world-wide.

Readers can hear him speaking to Mike Wills of 567 Cape Talk on Friday, 16 May, in Masterwriter Australia and on Saturday in The Territorial Imperative with Yewande Omotoso and Richard de Nooy, chaired by the equally outspoken Zukiswa Wanner.

Shifra Horn is a leading Israeli women author, who has also lived in New Zealand and Japan. As a leukaemia survivor, Horn has a unique world vision and approach to life.

Readers can hear her speak on Friday, 16 May, in Identity: cultural resource or confinement?, in which she, Njabulo Ndebele and Richard de Nooy will discuss an issue all South Africans grapple with, chaired by broadcaster, writer and film-maker Kgomotso Matsunyane.

Visit our website at www.flf.co.za and take a look at the 175 authors coming this year.

Don’t miss this great annual celebration of writers and reading!

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2012 Franschhoek Literary Festival Programme Now Live (Buy Your Tickets!)

The programme for this year’s Franschhoek Literary Festival is now live on the FLF homepage. An annual feast of all things literary, the 2012 festival take place from 11 to 13 May.

Remember to check back from time to time for any additions or amendments to the programme.

Bookings for events are now open, so log into Web Tickets asap! We look forward to welcoming you in Franschhoek!

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Some 2012 programme highlights:

FRIDAY 11 MAY 2012

The Miracle of Crocodile FlatsNinevehHomemaking for the Down-at-HeartThe Garden of Evening MistsOne Day I Will Write About This PlaceMy Father, My MonsterEntanglement

Novels as entertainment? Milan Kundera wrote: “The great European novel started out as entertainment, and every true novelist is nostalgic for it.” Jenny Hobbs (The Miracle of Crocodile Flats) asks fellow novelists Henrietta Rose-Innes (Nineveh), Finuala Dowling (Homemaking for the Down-at-Heart) and Tan Twan Eng (The Garden of Evening Mists) whether they agree – or not

Growing up: John Maytham probes the very different childhoods of Binyavanga Wainaina (One Day I Will Write about This Place), McIntosh Polela (My Father, My Monster) and Chris van Wyk (Eggs to Lay, Chickens to Hatch)

Entanglement: Tymon Smith in conversation with Steven Boykey Sidley

Drum and the 50s: Njabulo Ndebele discusses the Drum heyday and its iconic journalists with Zukiswa Wanner and Mike Nicol, who wrote the now-out-of-print A Goodlooking Corpse

SATURDAY 12 MAY

Killing KebbleThe Last SushiChallenging BeliefsLetters to My ChildrenThe Institute for Taxi Poetry

Freedom of information? Brett Murray’s poster from the 80s says it all: SAVE THE PRESS. Mike Wills conducts what could be a post-mortem with Anton Harber (Diepsloot), Mandy Wiener (Killing Kebble), Mondli Makhanya and cartoonist Zapiro (The Last Sushi)

Challenging Beliefs: John Maytham in conversation with sports scientist Tim Noakes and sports writer Michael Vlismas

Tweeting for Africa: Jenny Crwys-Williams talks to three master tweeters who reach thousands with their wit and wisdom: Jonathan Jansen (Letters to My Children), Gareth Cliff (On Everything) and Gus Silber

Is crime fiction the new political novel? Lynda Gilfillan threw down the gauntlet in a debate about genre snobs on Stellenbosch University’s SLiPnet site, and chairs the next round of jousting with Margie Orford (Gallows Hill), Leon de Kock (Bad Sex) and Imraan Coovadia (The Institute for Taxi Poetry)

SUNDAY 13 MAY

Advocates for ChangeThe Shadow WorldCocktail Hour Under the Tree of ForgetfulnessGareth Cliff on EverythingHistory of a Pleasure SeekerWhen in Broad Daylight I Open My EyesOther SignsThe Tempest Prognosticator

Learning from our mistakes: Peter Harris (Birth) chairs this essential discussion with Moeletsi Mbeki (Advocates for Change), Andrew Feinstein (The Shadow World) and Ray Hartley, editor of the Sunday Times

The price of fame: Ndumiso Ngcobo (Some of My Best Friends are White) asks Alexandra Fuller (Cocktail Hour under the Tree of Forgetfulness), Gareth Cliff and Richard Mason (History of a Pleasure Seeker) what it’s like to be in the public eye – the highs, the exposure, the downside of being recognized and the mixed blessing of persistent fans

Two to tango: Andrew Brown (Solace) talks to husband-and-wife team Lisa Lazarus and Greg Fried about their co-authored psychological thriller When in Broad Daylight I Open my Eyes (by Greg Lazarus)

The lyric ‘I’: Finuala Dowling introduces poets Ingrid de Kok (Other Signs) and Isobel Dixon (The Tempest Prognosticator)

~ ~ ~

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Harry Garuba Anticipates Kei Miller’s Visit to the FLF

Literary LandscapesThe Last Warner WomanJamaican author and poet Kei Miller is one of the writers that will be visiting South Africa for the Franschhoek Literary Festival this May. Harry Garuba, who will also feature at the FLF, talks about how Miller seeks new layers of language in his novel, The Last Warner Woman:

Having acquired a measure of recognition as poet and short-story writer, Kei Miller has turned to the extended form of the novel.

The publication of the Fear of Stones and Other Stories (2006), three volumes of poetry and an anthology, New Caribbean Poetry (2007), marked Miller’s entry into the literary landscape of modern West Indian/diasporic writers.

Book details

  • Literary Landscapes: From Modernism to Postcolonialism by Harry Garuba, Ina Grabe, Merry M Pawlowski, Carrol Clarkson, Johan Geertsema
    EAN: 9780230553163
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Stars From Afar at the Franschhoek Literary Festival

At this year’s Franschhoek Literary Festival, 13 – 15 May, authors coming from the UK, USA, Thailand, France, Jamaica, Uganda, Namibia and Zimbabwe will again rub shoulders with some of SA’s top writers.

“Our focus has always been on SA authors writing, or translated into English, with the ultimate goal of raising funds for a new community library,” says Jenny Hobbs, one of the originators and now the Director of the FLF. “But we also enjoy introducing to local readers international writers who are not well known here. And of course, there’s a big welcome for SA writers who live overseas,” she added.

Flying in from America is Zakes Mda, Professor of Creative Writing at Ohio University, though he commutes home regularly. His many commitments include beekeeping in the Eastern Cape, working with the Market Theatre, Johannesburg, and being a director of the Southern African Multimedia AIDS Trust in Sophiatown.

Mda will take part in Perspectives with Antony Altbeker, Justice Malala and SAFM’s Karabo Kgoleng, an event about autobiography with Janice Galloway from Scotland and Namibia’s Jane Katjavivi, chaired by Jenny Crwys-Williams, and Writing From Exile with three fellow SA writers who live overseas, Barbara Trapido, Julian de Wette and Christopher Hope.

Trapido, a book club favourite, is travelling from Oxford to discuss issues round her recent novel Sex & Stravinsky, and will be joined by her chef/writer daughter Anna Trapido, author of the Madiba memoir, Hunger for Freedom.

An FLF favourite coming for the third time from London is Justin Cartwright, whose recent novel Other People’s Money is getting rave reviews overseas.

Janice Galloway and Kei Miller are flying in from Glasgow courtesy of the British Council, both impressively talented and engaging speakers at last year’s Edinburgh International Book Fair.

Galloway is a musician and teacher who is now considered one of Scotland’s top authors. She will be chatting to Ann Donald of Kalk Bay Books, and in an event called Digging Deeper, will join Peter Godwin and forensic scientist David Klatzow to talk about the surprises they uncover in their research, chaired by Michele Magwood.

Kei Miller is a Jamaican poet and novelist who teaches creative writing at Glasgow University, and local writers should not miss the opportunity to hear him in conversation with Harry Garuba, Director of the Centre for African Studies at UCT. He will also appear in Mindfields with poet Finuala Dowling, Doreen Baingana and Christopher Hope, and in Can You Teach Writing? with fellow creative writing teachers Dowling, poet Kobus Moolman and Leon de Kock, Head of English at Stellenbosch.

Doreen Baingana is the Ugandan writer whose Tropical Fish: Stories Out of Entebbe won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book in 2006. She will be brought to Franschhoek by the African Arts Institute, and appears also in Secret Women’s Business and Short Stories Africa.

In a new departure, there will be several graphic events at FLF 2011. Graphic novelist Marguerite Abouet, the Côte d’Ivoire-born author of the Aya series which have been runaway bestsellers in France and the USA, is this year’s French Institute writer.

Appearing with her in Serious vs Hilarious is another bestselling author new to our shores: crime writer and cartoonist Colin Cotterill whose novels about a coroner set in Laos in the 1970s have been praised as having, “richer plots than Alexander McCall Smith’s SA detective stories, but the same comic charm.”

And there are more. Tony Park is the Australian equivalent of Wilbur Smith, with an equal passion for Africa, spending months here in the bush every year. He and Cotterill will be appearing with our own Mike Nicol in the literary version of Skop, Skiet en Donder.

Zimbabwean writers who have also tapped the bestselling vein include Peter Godwin and Douglas Rogers, who appear together and separately in Zimbos, Bush Wars and Roads Less Travelled, the grand finale of the 70 events at FLF 2011.

The FLF is presented in association with Porcupine Ridge Wines and the Sunday Times, and is further made possible through the generosity of Franschhoek guest house owners and voluntary workers who give their time and energy to make it an event to remember. Ticket proceeds and other donations go towards the FLF Library Fund. The full FLF programme is available on www.flf.co.za. Bookings are open and tickets can be booked on www.webtickets.co.za. Ticket prices remain unchanged at R60 per event, unless otherwise indicated.


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FLF Attendee Colin Cotterill Nominated for a Dilys Award

Colin and Jess Cotterill

As we posted yesterday, Laos-based crime writer Colin Cotterill will be attending this year’s Franschhoek Literary Festival, and news just in is that his latest, Love Songs from a Shallow Grave, is a shortlistee for the Dilys Award, given each year by the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association in the USA!

The winner will be announced towards the end of March. Good luck Colin!

Love Songs from a Shallow Grave

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